Monthly Archives: October 2015

The Crescent Nebula (also known as NGC 6888, Caldwell 27, Sharpless 105)

I may need to get the number from someone to the Saturation Help Group, but I really like this image. This is the Crescent and the surrounding nebulosity. I love the almost fan shaped nebulosity next to the Crescent (thing that looks like a floating brain). I hope you all enjoy it and suggestions are welcome! Please like the page, comment and read the full explanation below.
Nebula The Crescent Nebula (also known as NGC 6888, Caldwell 27, Sharpless 105) is an emission nebula in the constellation Cygnus, about 5000 light-years away. It was discovered by Friedrich Wilhelm Herschel in 1792.[2] It is formed by the fast stellar wind from the Wolf-Rayet star WR 136 (HD 192163) colliding with and energizing the slower moving wind ejected by the star when it became a red giant around 250,000[3] to 400,000[citation needed] years ago. The result of the collision is a shell and two shock waves, one moving outward and one moving inward. The inward moving shock wave heats the stellar wind to X-ray-emitting temperatures.
It is a rather faint object located about 2 degrees SW of Sadr. For most telescopes it requires a UHC or OIII filter to see. Under favorable circumstances a telescope as small as 8 cm (with filter) can see its nebulosity. Larger telescopes (20 cm or more) reveal the crescent or a Euro sign shape which makes some to call it the “Euro sign nebula”.NGC 6888 5-0 sig

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Bing Image of the Day!

Temples 3 1-2Well its Bing day here in the neighborhood. I’ve had images on a myriad of sites and a ton of astro sites but to be the featured image of the day on a big site like Bing / Microsoft is pretty cool. Thanks for spreading the word and getting mainstream sites interested in Astro images! Well done!

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IC405 also known as the Flaming Star Nebula

This is IC405 also known as the Flaming Star Nebula (see details below). Made from only 15 frames of color data its a pretty cool object and turned out surprisingly well considering the low amount of data.
IC405 RGB 2-2t
IC 405 (also known as the Flaming Star Nebula, SH 2-229, or Caldwell 31) is an emission/reflection nebula in the constellation Auriga, surrounding the bluish star AE Aurigae. It shines at magnitude +6.0. It is located near the emission nebula IC 410, the open clusters M38 and M36, and the naked-eye K-class star Hassaleh. The nebula measures approximately 37.0′ x 19.0′, and lies about 1,500 light-years away. It is believed that the proper motion of the central star can be traced back to the Orion’s Belt area. The nebula is about 5 light-years across.

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Now how many of you prefer a Red Rose?

See previous Black and White Version as well.
Rosette 2-6 deep filter
The Rosette Nebula (also known as Caldwell 49) is a large, circular H II region located near one end of a giant molecular cloud in the Monoceros region of the Milky Way Galaxy. The open cluster, in the center, NGC 2244 (Caldwell 50) is closely associated with the nebulosity, the stars of the cluster having been formed from the nebula’s matter.
The cluster and nebula lie at a distance of some 5,000 light-years from Earth [3]) and measure roughly 50 light years in diameter. The radiation from the young stars excites the atoms in the nebula, causing them to emit radiation themselves producing the emission nebula we see. The mass of the nebula is estimated to be around 10,000 solar masses.
It is believed that stellar winds from a group of O and B stars are exerting pressure on interstellar clouds to cause compression, followed by star formation in the nebula. This star formation is currently still ongoing.

A survey of the nebula with the Chandra X-ray Observatory in 2001 has revealed the presence of very hot, young stars at the core of the Rosette Nebula. These stars have heated the surrounding gas to a temperature in the order of 6 million kelvins causing them to emit copious amounts of X-rays.
Thanks Wikipedia!

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A Rose for all my Lady followers!

This is the Rosette Nebula (Caldwell 49) also includes a ton of other astronomical indicators. This is with a C14 with Hyperstar and a QHY12 camera. About 15 hours of Ha exposures and READ below for more information on this beautiful area.
Rosette Ha 1-2 flat
The Rosette Nebula (also known as Caldwell 49) is a large, circular H II region located near one end of a giant molecular cloud in the Monoceros region of the Milky Way Galaxy. The open cluster, in the center, NGC 2244 (Caldwell 50) is closely associated with the nebulosity, the stars of the cluster having been formed from the nebula’s matter.
The cluster and nebula lie at a distance of some 5,000 light-years from Earth [3]) and measure roughly 50 light years in diameter. The radiation from the young stars excites the atoms in the nebula, causing them to emit radiation themselves producing the emission nebula we see. The mass of the nebula is estimated to be around 10,000 solar masses.
It is believed that stellar winds from a group of O and B stars are exerting pressure on interstellar clouds to cause compression, followed by star formation in the nebula. This star formation is currently still ongoing.

A survey of the nebula with the Chandra X-ray Observatory in 2001 has revealed the presence of very hot, young stars at the core of the Rosette Nebula. These stars have heated the surrounding gas to a temperature in the order of 6 million kelvins causing them to emit copious amounts of X-rays.
Thanks Wikipedia!

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