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Melting the Milky Way. These are the 5 beehive smelters at Frisco, Utah

Melting the Milky Way. These are the 5 beehive smelters at Frisco, Utah (one is a little hard to make out as the top has collapsed.) These kilns are very well preserved for having been made in the 1870’s.

I had shot the headframe of the Horn Silver Mine first, then the rock house in the main part of Frisco and then wandered over to the kilns. The wind had died down slightly but a line of clouds was passing through. I considered a shot with the clouds but there were only a few holes in the cloud cover so decided to wait it out.

At last the skies began to clear and I set out to shoot the kilns first then shoot the sky to give it more time to clear out. By the time I was ready to shoot the sky it looked really nice to the eye, but after the shot I noticed halos around the brighter stars so either dust or mist was still in the air.

I normally would have trashed the shot but I really liked the kilns so I put it together anyway. It’s interesting, I don’t really talk about it but I’m insane for star profiles and getting the star focus perfect. I spent too long doing deep space astrophotography where star profile, color and geometry is not important, it’s vital. I cringe when I see Milky Way shots with huge misshapen stars. Giant pet peeve.

So the stars having halos at the outset made the image rather cringe-worthy to me. But after I stitched them all together I thought, you know this tends to give them some extra color and I think I like it. No, I think I like it a lot.

Curious what others think, The airglow had continued from earlier although the light clouds caused Milford to throw some yellow light polution up there. I personally really like it, it’s different for me and I like different.

Please LIKE the Page and read the backstory on the area below.

Technical: Canon 6D, 55mm f 1.6, ISO 8000, 42 images, left edge of ground cropped and expanded.

Backstory to the area: Located in Beaver County, Utah are the silent remains of the once booming mining camp of Frisco. Though, its life was short, it is filled with history, from millions of dollars in ore taken from the Horn Silver Mine to shoot-outs in its dusty streets. Today its crumbling foundations, charcoal ovens, and silent cemetery speak eloquently of its rich and varied past.

Frisco’s story starts with two prospectors by the names of James Ryan and Samuel Hawks in September, 1875. The pair worked at the Galena Mine in the San Francisco Mining District, which embraced approximately seven square miles on both flanks of the San Francisco Mountains. One day while on their way to work, they stopped to test a large outcropping for ore. When they found a solid ore body, they immediately staked a claim. Fearing that the mineral body was not very large, they decided to sell their claim rather than work it. Sadly for Ryan and Hawks, the new owners extracted some 25,000 tons of ore with high silver content by the end of the 1870s.

Near the mine, the town of Frisco soon sprouted up, named for the San Francisco Mountains. Another mine called the Horn Silver Mine was also discovered in 1875, and would soon become largest producer in the area. With the success of the Horn Silver Mine, the Frisco Mining and Smelting Company expanded its workings in July 1877 by constructing a smelter that included five beehive charcoal kilns. Frisco soon developed as the post office and commercial center for the district, as well as the terminus of the Utah Southern Railroad extension from Milford, some fifteen miles to the east
Other mines located in the district included the Blackbird, Cactus, Carbonate, Comet, Imperial, King David, Rattler, and Yellow Jacket, but the Silver Horn was bar far the largest.

By 1879 the United States Annual Mining Review and Stock Ledger was calling the Silver Horn Mine “the richest silver mine in the world now being worked.” Frisco was bustling and on June 23, 1880, the Utah Southern Railroad Extension steamed into town, allowing the mines the opportunity for less expensive shipping.

Though there were a number of roaring mining camps in the San Francisco district, Frisco soon gained a reputation for being the wildest. Like many boomtowns, its streets were lined with over twenty saloons, gambling dens and brothels. Reaching a peak population of nearly 6,000, vice and crime became prevalent in the town. One writer described it as “Dodge City, Tombstone, Sodom and Gomorrah all rolled into one.”

Murders were said to have been so frequent that city officials contracted to have a wagon pick up the bodies and take them to boot hill for burial. Eventually, a lawman from Pioche, Nevada was hired and given free reign to “clean up the town.” When the tough marshal appeared on the scene, he allegedly told the town that he had no intentions of making arrests or building jail. Instead, the lawless element had two options – get out of town or get shot. Apparently, some of the wicked did not take the new marshal seriously as he reportedly killed six outlaws on his first night in town. After that, most of the lawless moved on and Frisco became a milder place for its citizens.

On the morning of February 12, 1885, when the miners reported for duty, they were told to wait as tremors were shaking the ground. Taking precautions, as several cave-ins had previously occurred, the night shift came to the surface, and the day crew waited. Within minutes a massive cave-in occurred, collapsing tunnels down to the seventh level and shutting off the richest part of the mine. The cause of the collapse was blamed on inadequately timbered tunnels bearing the tremendous weight of the rain and snow soaked ground above. The collapse was so great that the cave-in was felt as far away as Milford, where some windows were reportedly broken. Fortunately, no one was killed, but the cave-in spelled the eventual demise of Frisco.

By 1885 over $60,000,000 in zinc, copper, lead, silver, and gold had been hauled away from Frisco by mule train and the Utah Southern Railroad. After the collapse of the mine, it began to produce again within a year, but never on the scale of its fabulous past.

By the turn of the century only fourteen businesses were still alive in Frisco and its population had decline to 500. By 1912, only twelve businesses existed in the dwindling town of 150. By the 1920s, Frisco was a ghost town.

In 1982, Frisco’s kilns were placed on National Register of Historic Places.
In 2002, a mining company began to rework the mines of Frisco, so only the charcoal kilns and cemetery are accessible today. Frisco, Utah, is just off route 21, 15 miles west of Milford.

http://www.legendsofamerica.com/ut-frisco.html

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Milky Way Melt.

Milky Way Melt. Is the Milky Way melting into the ground? At White Pocket it always looks like things are melting, including the rocks themselves.This scene is the back side of the “Frog” at White Pocket and is a raised ridge of white that walks out to the distance and looks like melting ice cream.

This night was one of the greatest nights of shooting I ever had. I arrived on a Tuesday night and had White Pocket completely to myself. The day had been 101 but as the sun set it dropped into the high 80’s and was very pleasant. A light breeze kept it comfortable the whole night, with just a light hoodie needed for later. I sat back on the rocks taking in the scene before me. Such a crazy group of outlines so MANY stars. I was able to just lie back, put my hands behind my head and look up. It was pure bliss. Absolute quiet, a light breeze, the Milky Way blazing overhead, and relaxing for a change during a shot. That’s unheard of! I was almost sad when the shot ended and I had to gather my gear and make my way down off the wall. I literally could have slept there looking up.

Once again you can see why I love White Pocket, despite the difficulty getting there, it is amazing and worth recording.

PLEASE comment!

Thanks to all that have for your continuing support. Although it seems trite these days to express your thanks to people, it really, really does make me happy to know my work is appreciated.

/rant

Technical: Canon 6D 55mm, ISO 8000, f1.6, 42 images.

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The Milky Way Mine.

The Milky Way Mine. I’m distracted by rocks. I really am. So when I have a chance to combine mining with the Milky Way, well you know I’m going to do it. This scene is set in Frisco Utah. Frisco is the location of one of the richest silver mines in the 1870’s.

I had found this spot of a drive back from nearby Great Basin National Park. I found the bristlecone pine grove there still snowed in so just shot one panorama there. On the way back I was determined to scout some new spots for shooting. I was told about Crystal Mountain and had gone to explore it. There was a little sign on the highway back to Utah that said Historical Marker Ahead. I stopped to read it and as soon as I saw it was a ghost mining town complete with graveyard, I was all in.

It took some exploring and some of the paint off of Jimmy to get back in there but what a cool place. Great piles of refuse ore all sparkly and stained with fantastic color. There was a collapsed mine, a stone school house, 5 stone smelting kilns and this fine headframe of the the Horn Silver Mine.

The Horn Silver Mine by 1885 had mined over over $60,000,000 worth of zinc, copper, lead, silver, and gold. There is a way cool backstory to all this and I’m going to include it even though its a pretty long read.

But before I do let me finish the scene here. It was very windy this night high on top of San Francisco mountain. Dust and sand blew about, the metal roof pieces creaked and clattered during the shots. The area I was shooting from was wedged back into a corner to get the right angle on the Milky Way. Being back in this corner made the sounds echo and appear to be from the left the right and even behind me at times. Most disorienting while waiting on the images to finish. I ran over a pit viper on the way up the hill to this spot so the noises actually did make me prick my ears up.

The breeze, or something else put up a wild green airglow behind the buildings (some light pollution back there which I reduced).

Beyond the buildings was a nearly intact series of ore sorting bins. There will be two more images from the area but what a cool night and location. I’ll give you the specs but please read the backstory, its unbelievable.

PLEASE  comment and like the Image. THANKS!

Technical: Canon 6D ISO 8000, F1.6, 55mm 42 images

Back story: Located in Beaver County, Utah are the silent remains of the once booming mining camp of Frisco. Though, its life was short, it is filled with history, from millions of dollars in ore taken from the Horn Silver Mine to shoot-outs in its dusty streets. Today its crumbling foundations, charcoal ovens, and silent cemetery speak eloquently of its rich and varied past.

Frisco’s story starts with two prospectors by the names of James Ryan and Samuel Hawks in September, 1875. The pair worked at the Galena Mine in the San Francisco Mining District, which embraced approximately seven square miles on both flanks of the San Francisco Mountains. One day while on their way to work, they stopped to test a large outcropping for ore. When they found a solid ore body, they immediately staked a claim. Fearing that the mineral body was not very large, they decided to sell their claim rather than work it. Sadly for Ryan and Hawks, the new owners extracted some 25,000 tons of ore with high silver content by the end of the 1870s.

Near the mine, the town of Frisco soon sprouted up, named for the San Francisco Mountains. Another mine called the Horn Silver Mine was also discovered in 1875, and would soon become largest producer in the area. With the success of the Horn Silver Mine, the Frisco Mining and Smelting Company expanded its workings in July 1877 by constructing a smelter that included five beehive charcoal kilns. Frisco soon developed as the post office and commercial center for the district, as well as the terminus of the Utah Southern Railroad extension from Milford, some fifteen miles to the east

Other mines located in the district included the Blackbird, Cactus, Carbonate, Comet, Imperial, King David, Rattler, and Yellow Jacket, but the Silver Horn was bar far the largest.

By 1879 the United States Annual Mining Review and Stock Ledger was calling the Silver Horn Mine “the richest silver mine in the world now being worked.” Frisco was bustling and on June 23, 1880, the Utah Southern Railroad Extension steamed into town, allowing the mines the opportunity for less expensive shipping.

Though there were a number of roaring mining camps in the San Francisco district, Frisco soon gained a reputation for being the wildest. Like many boomtowns, its streets were lined with over twenty saloons, gambling dens and brothels. Reaching a peak population of nearly 6,000, vice and crime became prevalent in the town. One writer described it as “Dodge City, Tombstone, Sodom and Gomorrah all rolled into one.”

Murders were said to have been so frequent that city officials contracted to have a wagon pick up the bodies and take them to boot hill for burial. Eventually, a lawman from Pioche, Nevada was hired and given free reign to “clean up the town.” When the tough marshal appeared on the scene, he allegedly told the town that he had no intentions of making arrests or building jail. Instead, the lawless element had two options – get out of town or get shot. Apparently, some of the wicked did not take the new marshal seriously as he reportedly killed six outlaws on his first night in town. After that, most of the lawless moved on and Frisco became a milder place for its citizens.

On the morning of February 12, 1885, when the miners reported for duty, they were told to wait as tremors were shaking the ground. Taking precautions, as several cave-ins had previously occurred, the night shift came to the surface, and the day crew waited. Within minutes a massive cave-in occurred, collapsing tunnels down to the seventh level and shutting off the richest part of the mine. The cause of the collapse was blamed on inadequately timbered tunnels bearing the tremendous weight of the rain and snow soaked ground above. The collapse was so great that the cave-in was felt as far away as Milford, where some windows were reportedly broken. Fortunately, no one was killed, but the cave-in spelled the eventual demise of Frisco.

By 1885 over $60,000,000 in zinc, copper, lead, silver, and gold had been hauled away from Frisco by mule train and the Utah Southern Railroad. After the collapse of the mine, it began to produce again within a year, but never on the scale of its fabulous past.

By the turn of the century only fourteen businesses were still alive in Frisco and its population had decline to 500. By 1912, only twelve businesses existed in the dwindling town of 150. By the 1920s, Frisco was a ghost town.

In 1982, Frisco’s kilns were placed on National Register of Historic Places.

In 2002, a mining company began to rework the mines of Frisco, so only the charcoal kilns and cemetery are accessible today. Frisco, Utah, is just off route 21, 15 miles west of Milford.

http://www.legendsofamerica.com/ut-frisco.html

Headframe 60 Final fla smt

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Mars Halo

Mars Dog. As many know Mars is really bright right now. I normally just discard images with much in the way of clouds but this one seemed interesting. It had what appeared to be a Mars Dog. It might just be a illusion of the clouds although I’ve never seen one before. I tweaked the halo up one arrow on curves just to make it a hair more obvious but it was there.

The image looked a lot better than I expected once it was assembled. The clouds seem to add some drama to the image, maybe I shouldn’t toss cloud images out as readily.

The image was taken quite near the Pahreah Township near Kanab Utah. and as you can easily see the rock layering and colors are phenomenal. My iPano had been injured the night before in a wicked wind. I arrived at Paria early enough to take it apart and attempt a repair. I managed to get it done with duct tape and velcro. Seriously. While the repair allowed it to actually work it had some play in the mechanism that allowed a tiny bit of movement. A couple of frames suffered but not too much.

Please enjoy. Comments are always welcome please do.

About Paria:

This short track descends from the junction with US 89 (milepost 31) into a valley with the remains of the Pahreah ghost town plus the site of a 1930’s movie set, both surrounded by amazingly colorful rocks. The road is 6 miles long, and becomes rather steep and twisting near the end, as it crosses the undulating banded hills that cover this area. The cliffs at either side are equally layered and multi-colored, with alternating red, white, purple and grayish-blue strata, part of the Petrified Forest Member of the Chinle Formation. There is a large parking area to accommodate the occasional tour buses that used to visit the area; the track continues another mile but deteriorates as it crosses a dry wash a couple of times, passes the old Paria Cemetery which has about 20 graves, their inscriptions faded and illegible, and enters the wide valley of the Paria River. The original Pahreah townsite is located just across the river but very little remains today – just a few stone foundations and remains of wooden fences. The settlement was established in 1869 but abandoned 40 years later because of frequent floods of the river, which flows along a wide valley that is often completely dry in summer but covered in places by an extensive plain of white salt crystals, left from evaporation of the last of the spring flash floods. There are many possible hikes starting from this area, including the route to Starlight Canyon.

The few scattered wooden buildings of the movie set were situated just beyond the parking area, and featured in many films including some scenes of The Outlaw Josey Wales. They had quite an authentic appearance due to many years of ageing in the desert sun, until in 1999 they were deemed too unstable and all were dismantled, the timbers being saved for future restoration projects elsewhere. In 2000 two replicas of the largest buildings were erected in their place but these were burned down in August 2006.

Technical: Canon 6D, 50mm f1.8, ISO 6400, 42 image panorama.Paria Mars Dog

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Crown the Frog!

The Crown Prince Frog. The “Frog” as I call this unusual rock formation at White Pocket AZ appears as if the Milky Way is about to crown it with the Antares region. Included in the royal crown is Saturn, Mars and the Rho Ophiuchus region. Its a beautiful sight at night, and this night I lucked out and had the place all to myself. Well apart from a couple very vocal frogs in the area.

The sky was finally clear, not a cloud in sight and only a faint wispy breeze blowing over the hill, just enough to tussle my hair from time to time. I was surprised by the frogs cries as the temperature had dropped to the low 50’s and was continuing to fall.

The breeze was just enough to occasionally shift my now damaged iPano, I had literally fixed it with duct tape and velcro. It had a small amount of play in the rotation gears but at least it would work for the last night of my 11 day trip and the 1st totally clear night. 4,654 miles and one clear night, ouch.

I’ll include a video of the location from a couple days earlier so you can see what I’m talking about when I talk about the Frog. Check for it in the comments. I’d still love to get a group together to learn how to do Milky Way photography and take them to White Pocket. The worlds craziest geological place. It’s so amazing you can’t even understand it. See my daytime pictures from roughly the same place but facing west to get an idea about how cool it is here.

Please  comment! Enjoy everyone!

Technical: Canon 6D, 50mm f/1.8, ISO 6400, 42 images in a 6 x 7 matrix.

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